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Profile and Development Strategy for Craft in Canada
Presented by Tom McFall, Executive Director, Alberta Craft Council


A Study coordinated by Conseil des métiers d'art du Québec (CMAQ) for the Canadian Craft Federation/Fédération canadienne des métiers d'art (CCF/FCMA) and prepared by Bert Pereboom, Peartree Solutions Inc., October , 2003.

This Profile and Development Strategy for Craft in Canada seeks to fulfill two major purposes: first, to provide a qualitative and quantitative profile of the craft sector in Canada, and second, to work towards a consensus strategy for craft sector development to be implemented for professional craftpersons by national and provincial craft organizations, and other supporting groups. Though many provinces have surveyed and measured craft communities in their own jurisdictions over the last decade or two, this study marks the first time that a consistent methodology to measure craft activity was applied across Canada. This also marks the first attempt to develop a cohesive domestic and international development strategy for the craft community in Canada.

The profile reveals a sector that is largely populated with skilled craftpersons working in home-based and other small studios producing one of a kind work or production work. By current employment standards the hours worked tend to be long, and the wages and incomes relatively low. At the same time, the sector supports the cultural richness and diversity of Canada that cannot be measured in dollar values. Craft activities are estimated to support some 22,600 individuals, generating total output valued at $727 million, and exports approaching $100 million dollars annually, representing 16 percent of craft revenue of the survey respondents.

A national strategy for the next stage of craft sector development is both necessary and appropriate at this time. The craft sector shows a developing awareness of its potential as both an economic and cultural industry in Canada. A concerted strategy that builds domestic and international markets has great potential to increase both employment and the average incomes in the variety of creative pursuits that make up craft activity in Canada.

For a hard copy of the study please contact: info@canadiancraftsfederation.ca.

You can download the Executive Summary and the complete study by going to
http://www.canadiancraftsfederation.ca/html/advocate_ccf.html and click on the pdf format link. 

The Canadian Crafts Federation site also contains information and links to all 10 Provincial Craft Councils, and they in turn are linked to many other organizations.

  










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